59 million subsurface mineral estates

Natives in 567 federally recognized tribes in the 48 contiguous States and Alaska. The BIA’s natural resource programs assist tribes in the management, development, and protection of Indian trust land and natural resources on 56 million surface acres and 59 million subsurface mineral estates. These programs enable tribal trust landowners to optimize sustainable stewardship and use of resources, providing benefits such as revenue, jobs and the protection of cultural, spiritual, neodymium magnets balls
Functions for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) are authorized under Title V of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. A TERA is a means by which a tribe could be authorized to review, approve, and manage business agreements, leases, and rights-of-way pertaining to energy

where to buy rare earth magnetsand traditional resources. Income from energy production is the largest source of revenue generated from trust lands, with royalty income of $534 million in 2016. Indian Energy Actions i. Clarify “Inherently Federal Functions for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) are authorized under Title V of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. A TERA is a means by which a tribe could be authorized to review, approve, and manage business agreements, leases, and rights-of-way pertaining to energy development on Indian trust n52 magnets lands, absent approval of each individual transaction by the Secretary. Interior promulgated TERA regulations in 2008 at 25 CFR part 224. The TERAs offer the opportunity to promote development of domestically produced energy resources on Indian land; however, 12 years after the passage of the Act and 9 years after the issuance of TERA regulations, not one tribe has sought Interior’s approval for a TERA. One theory asserted by at least one tribe as to the failure of this legislation is the Act does not address precisely how much Federal oversight would disappear for tribes operating under TERAs. Specifically, Interior had not defined the term “inherently Federal functions” that Interior will retain following approval of a TERA. This term appears in Interior’s regulations at 25 CFR §§ 224.52(c) and 224.53(e)(2), but not in the Act. Without some assurance as to the benefits (in terms of less Federal oversight) a tribe would receive through clarification of “inherently Federal functions,” tribes have no incentive to undergo the intensive process of applying for a TERA. Clarification of this phrase would also address Recommendation 5 of GAO-15-502, Indian Energy Development: Poor Management by BIA Has Hindered Energy Development on Indian Lands (June 2015). The recommendation directedmagnets bar Interior to “provide additional energy 35 development-specific guidance on provisions of TERA regulations that tribes have identified to Interior as unclear.” The BIA has been working closely with the Office of the Solicitor to develop guidance on how Interior will interpret the term “inherently Federal functions.” It is expected that by providing this certainty as to the scope of Federal oversight, tribes will better be able to justify the process of applying for a TERA. The BIA expects to have the guidance finalized and available on its website by October 2017. The BIA anticipates that the benefits of this action will be to promote

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